Tosa Inu

Tosa Inu

Postby sunnyAK on 7. December 2011, 21:40

Tosa Inu
First two pictures of a Tosa Inu from the Netherlands owned by a friend of mine called Ton. Thank you for sending me the pictures Ton. ;)
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the following text is written by a gentleman called Hugo:
I have to start necessarily realizing that literature which deals with the origin and description of the Tosa Inu generally agree that this breed is one of the most fascinating and yet least understood, like the culture that it comes from. His character, indeed, reflects many of the attributes of Japanese culture and mentality.

Tosa Inu literally means "Tosa Dog. In languages other than Japanese suffix "Inu" is sometimes overlooked. A variant of this name is Tosa Ken. Both "Ken" and "Inu" mean dog in Japanese. Therefore, both are correct, but the expression Tosa Ken is more generally used in spoken language. The Tosa is also known as Tosa Token or Tosa Toukan which literally means "Tosa Fighting Dog". In other places is also often called Japanese Fighting Dog or Japanese Mastiff.

The Tosa was created specifically as a fighting dog and in this activity has been used since its origin centuries ago. However, is very important to keep in mind that the Tosa has gone through two stages clearly identified to the point that it might be argued that these are two different breeds. Thus, the Tosa originally did not have the phenotype we see in the current Tosa. Initially formed by crossing dogs native to Shikoku dedicated primarily to hunt bears, and through this selection it is produced a medium-sized dog of spitz type that villagers largely destined to fighting, and called Shikoku-Ken. With this morphology that dog was extended to many other areas of Japan and remained so until the mid-eighteenth century. The breed was named with the name of the area where it originated, the ancient province of Tosa, now known as Kochi Prefecture in Shikoku, the smallest of the four Japanese islands. At that time, the province of Tosa was one of two areas where dog fighting were more popular, the other was the Akita prefecture (hence where the Akita came from), the northernmost part of Honshu Island. This is the island of Shikoku:

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And this is the prefecture of Kochi, formerly known as Tosa:

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This is the Shikoku/Kochi type of dog that must have been use as foundationfor the Tosa Breed:

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As far as I know (although I explicitly warn that this is not a widespread information), initially the Akita breed was stronger than the Tosa, but gradually this situation was reversed because of mix of the Tosa with European breeds. Also breeds Akita and Tosa were mixed to each other causing a mixed dog that was called "Shin Akita".

The great transformation towards the Tosa in its current structure and temperament came when Japan's policy of isolation ended with the Meiji Restoration from 1866 to 1869. So more and more foreigners entered the country with large dogs that proved to be great fighters and regularly beat the Japanese fighting dogs. The Japanese were impressed by the size, strength and endurance of these dogs in the West, as well as their fighting skills. But his pride suffered an injury directly proportional to his surprise. As a reaction, they took the Shikoku to mix it with these foreign dogs. To create the current Tosa Ken Shikoku was crossed with Bulldogs (1872), with English Mastiff (1874), with German Pointers (1876), with Great Danes (1924) and finally with Bull Terriers and Saint Bernards, all of which were used to improve the breed by a sequential development. The selection of the breeds that made up the Tosa certainly was not random. Each breed was chosen in pursuit of a peculiar feature that wanted to print the final product. Thus, the English Mastiff and St. Bernard were selected for their size and power, the Bulldog and the Bull Terrier for their fighting ability, aggressiveness and tenacity unparalleled in the fight, and the German Pointer (remember that a dog is shown) by their ability to concentrate and focus on its goal.

It is important to note that the German Mastiff was not as big as German Mastiffs are today and the old English Bulldog and the old Bull Terrier had a structure and temperament totally different than those of today. We are talking about the Bulldog and Bull Terrier at a time when they had all their fighting ability and were the most powerful canine gladiators in the world. Within a short time the Japanese were successful in fixing a type which merged the features of "Sumo” Japanese. In 1925, the breed is already well defined and in 1930 an official association for the preservation and dissemination of the Tosa Inu breed was founded.

As you can see, through a program of selective breeding and careful with the finest specimens Shikoku Ken and the best individuals that could be imported from the West, it is originated a breed of athletic and agile construction but with an outward appearance of mastiff. The Tosa Inu so created is bold, brave and aggressive; of a great temperament. It shows a great power and like the true fighting dogs, a high pain threshold.

As I already mentioned, other breeds, like the old Akita Inu, were also actively used for fighting dogs for a long time until the real reconstituted Tosa Inu showed an overwhelming superiority over the rest. Connoisseurs recall an emblematic battle between a well-known Akita named Gatama and a Tosa known as Amagiyama which enabled the Japanese to convince themselves the ostensible superiority of Tosa. The infusion of blood of Tosa in the Akita, only allowed to have a half Tosa which proved to be not enough to defeat the true gladiator.

On two occasions during the twentieth century all breeds in Japan, including the Tosa, were in imminent danger of extinction. First, the food crisis during the Second World War and the invasion of allied forces, and later an epidemic of distemper Tosa led to the brink of extinction. The Association for the Preservation of Tosa decided to save a 12 Tosas, which by their nature and type were considered the most authentic representatives of the breed and brought them to Aormi prefecture in northern Japan, an area less exposed to the rigors of war. Of these 12 specimens and those obtained with the collaboration of Korea, a place that used to receive big number of Tosas, descend most genuine Tosas today.

The Tosa has a large and wide skull with a moderately long muzzle. The neck is exceptionally strong, and generally has a dewlap, but unlike other mastiffs the Tosa is not prone to drooling. The chest is particularly broad with exceptional flexibility in the ribs. The thighs are very muscular, with only a slight bend in the hock. The coat is short and dense, with colors ranging from mahogany, beige, or black matte. There are certain physical and aesthetic qualities that are strictly defined for the Tosa. Among examples of such characteristics, mahogany (or red) is the preferred color. White markings are only permissible on the chest, never on the face nor on the mouth, and the bite should be scissors. The skeletal structure of the Tosa should be big because small bones are indicative of a poor genetic sample, as also are the signs of shyness or reluctance in temperament. The life expectancy of the Tosa is 10 to 12 years. The most common health problems are related to giant breeds, such as inflammation of the joints, hip dysplasia and gastric torsion.

However, contrary to the requirements of the Japan Kennel Club and the FCI requiring the mahogany color as preferred, the traditional Tosa from Kochi and the those destined to dog fights have a greater range of solid colors or brindle, black or with white marks. It is not uncommon to find in Japan or Korea a fighting Tosa to be 60% white, which is not ideal, but if the animal shows good fighting skills that is important for the Japanese (and Koreans) who dedicate their dogs to fight; conformation is, of course, secondary. On the other hand, the white color comes from the old Bull Terrier and from St. Bernard whose blood Tosa carries in his veins. Further down, between the photos you'll find a Tosa with much white skin.

Therefore we have one of the few breeds of dogs in the world still lawfully used in dog fights. However, the Japanese developed a kind of fight in accordance with their mentality, which has no comparison with the known pit dogfighting made elsewhere.

In Japan, dogs are carefully bred and trained, and the contest is conducted under strict rules and accompanied by sacred rituals. I have read that these battles are governed by about 250 rules, which I think is a huge exaggeration (if this is true we should send the dogs to school to learn all those rules before they can fight). The battles are real exhibition of power and are designed to last long. During the meeting 3 judges sit on top of which is a caged ring (the kind seen in some photos), the owners are located at the same level and in the ring there are two more judges. Owners are allowed to enter the ring when needed. Dogs are allowed to cast small grunts only during the first 2 minutes of the battle, after which they must struggle in silence. The whining, the moaning or growling dog automatically makes him a loser. The same happens if a dog turns away from the opponent or three steps back when attacked. Similar to the wrestle of the Sumo, dogs and kept trying to take each other on the floor. If it dominates the contender for longer than 3 minutes (or 5 minutes if the fight has lasted over 15 minutes) is declared the winner. In any event, the fight ends in a draw after 30 minutes if no dog proves to be superior. Like sumo wrestlers too, dogs are classified into a hierarchy according to the points they have earned. The best fighter Tosa receives the title of Yokozuna, like a famous sumo.

One of the characteristics of fighting rules in Japan is that females never fight.

Here I put several pictures of fine examples of Tosas. I hope you like them:

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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 15. January 2012, 11:32

Japanese mean Tosa Inu when they talk about a single Tosa dog, Tosa Ken actually is the breed in general.

The Tosa is made out of 4 breeds which I know is true in the history of the breed. There is absolutely no evidence of the influence of Bloodhound or Bordeauxdog to be found anywhere in Japanese history.
The original Tosa developed with nr 1, the Shikoku, nr 2 the Pointer, nr 3 the Boston Bull ( the later APBT) and a type of Mastiff dog. FYI, dogs in those days looked very different as the dogs we know today, so the Mastiff had really no special standard at all.


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The Pointer's influence has a simple reason, in those days people in Kochi didn't have access to Western breeds, because those type of dogs only showed up in big cities like Tokyo.

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Mastiff type of dog

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Boston Bull, was the origin of many other breeds, like for instance the APBT

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The Shikoku Ken is the foundation of the Tosa Inu, that's for sure. In the old Japan the island of Shikoku was divided into four regions, hence the name Shi (four) and Koku (region), the provinces of Awa, Tosa, Iyo and Sanuki, the modern prefectures of Tokushima Ken, Kochi Ken, Ehime Ken and Kogawa Ken . The old names are still used in these prefectures.



The Shikoku is one of the oldest Japanese breeds, and is slightly different in size between the Akita and Shiba Inu in. He was bred for hunting of origin, namely hunting deer and boar in the mountains of Kochi. Sometimes the breed is also known and called Kochi Ken . In 1930 Haruo Isogai made a study of the Japanese breeds and placed the species in the category of large, medium and small. The Shikoku belongs to the Shika Inu, in other words, the medium category.


The Kai Inu and Kisha fall into the same category. Although all races are very similar in terms of construction and color, the Shikoku is the smallest of the group Shika Inu. Three variants of this group are known as the Awa, the Hongawa and Hata all named after the area where they were originally bred in the Shikoku prefecture. Hongawa area was the most remote and secluded, so this line was the most pure and was considered the best type.

Regarding the information that the Nihon Ken is processed, it is not correct.

Nihon means Japan and inu means dog, no breed Nihon Inu or named Nihon Ken, ever excisted, and no one was previously called Shikoku Tosa, the Shikoku always was named Shikoku.


Here are some pictures of the early Tosa , where it's clear to see the influence of the Pointer.


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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 15. January 2012, 11:54

There are many stories about the influence of the Bordeaux dog in the making of the Tosa Inu. As one can find on the internet, the Dogue de Bordeaux seems to have played a major role in the past. 1910, 1930, 1950 and 1960 are dates that seem to be that Bordeaux went to Japan to give the Tosa more mass and a broader head.
First issue is the breed description of the JKC about the Tosa Inu, otherwise the Bordeaux dog would have been mentioned in it. Finally, the last breed description dates from after that period. After all millions of people live in Japan, and of course there will be a real Tosa breeder that experimented with breeds, but that was only experimental and has no proven effect on the Tosa, so certainly not influential. The various Mastiffs that are used in the past is a vague issue, a Mastiff with an underbite can not be placed in the category of Bordeaux.

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There has been over a 100 years not a single document found, where was stating that Bordeaux had any significant role played, like the St. Bernard, Bloodhound, or what breed is even mentioned on some websites.

In addition to the Bordeaux first recorded in Japan is a dog named "Grace" imported from France around 1920. Grace had to compete with its own different Tosas in Hokkaido, from a general manager of Tomakomai Oji Paper Company factory and had defeated them all. He was eventually defeated by a Tosa named Ushiya who was informed of the Aomori Prefecture by a man who was employed at the same factory where the owner of Grace was the manager. After this fight the man was fired because his boss had made so angry because Grace had lost.

Tosa in Hokkaido and Aomori were very different in those days than we used to nowadays and weighted average of only 30kg - 35kg. The best specimens were kept in Kochi.



There is also some info websites mentioned in the year 1954 and once in the 70 3 Bordeaux lines were crossed with the Tosa. It is even asserted that the Tosa as its red color is due and any underbite. Nonsense and fables.


Information on Bordeaux dog mix with the Tosa Ken (1954)


There are websites that say the Bordeaux dog was the last breed that was mixed with the Tosa Ken in the year 1954, with 3 dogs of the German breeder Mary Pufahl. Bordeaux mix dog was purely experimental test, not even an influential. Here is an article about this export dogs, written by the breeder Mary Pufahl. The dogs that she has carried to Japan in 1966, 1967 and 1968.


A piece of her correspondence with the Japanese Tosa Breeders Komamoto

At the end of 1965 has created an active correspondence between myself and a Japanese guy who was interested in these dogs. He tried to get information on the Dogue de Bordeaux, and especially his strength and fighting qualities, which, as one could read the collected correspondence, somewhat lacking in their own fighting dog "Tosa Inu" at that time. The qualities of the Dogue de Bordeaux had to offer their ideas naturally enough, they decided several puppies and a truly excellent adult male imported to Japan. The price was not important. They wanted a couple of DDB race as the first place, then to view the best dogs to choose from these nests and add it to the failing quality of the Tosa Imported 5 puppies were all together to improve the Tosa. Of the Orloff Coqueries, Opel Fenelon, and three females, the Ova Fenelon, offie de la Maison des Arbres, Pinup des Noirs Demon. In the second half of 1966, the unique stud Mowgli de la maison des Arbres, after the second mating in France to Japan. After Mowgli had arrived, had all of the above three females nests. Both of the studs Orloff and Opel, were declared as being unsuitable for breeding, although no reasons were given. Mowgli only survived the move to Japan for a short time. He was critically ill at the beginning of 1968. My attempt to return him failed. He died before the plane had left Tokyo airport. So according to this information, no dogs were exported to Japan in 1954 by Mary Pufahl to be mixed with the Tosa Ken.
.......... after 1965.

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What one can conclude from this, if someone with the Japanese nationality had some dogs imported and home bred Tosa's, it had no influence to the Tosa Inu breed. If, as described, the aim was improve the failing grades and strength of the Tosa, and it has been proved unsuccessful, it says more than enough about the qualities of the Bordeaux at that time. So it was just an occasional experiment in that year, an experiment that had absolutely no influence in the Japanese Tosa.

The Mastiff in history has played a major role in the development of the Tosa Inu. Since that time a mastiff dog was a dog with a very flexible standard and there has always been more than the pointer type, type of Bulldog, APBT and Mastiff type . For the people in the development of the breed, construction, color was not really important. The standard by which all professional Tosa breeders in Japan to adhere to is first and foremost the physical ability of the individual dogs they breed. Color and other non-functional and physical characteristics are secondary and play a minimal role in breeding criteria. Briefly described, it brings Tosas that can win. The fighting spirit of the Tosa, which clearly differ Tosa to most of the Molosser type breeds, varieties are now known to have lost their original fighting spirit, tenacity, and overall physical capacity for prolonged and sustained leagues. In Japan in the ring, the Tosa Inu has no equal.

Book of the dog, 1910

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Last edited by sumoaiko on 15. January 2012, 12:48, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 15. January 2012, 12:41

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Amagiyama, son of Kubo, first Zenkoku Yokozuna in Tosa History.
In an earlier post this dog was mentioned for a historical fight with Ozeki Akita Gatama. That fight made the Japanese realise that the Tosa was a far more superior dog in the ring and ended the fighting days of the Akita.

Akita Gatama

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In Japan there is great appreciation for the performance of a Tosa Inu. The reason that a Tosa has a commitment to Bushido, involves the story of the Tosa Kouryukan Gou. Kouryukan was a dog of a professor of Bushido in Tokyo, and his dojo called Kouryukan. The dog came from one of the best bloodlines Yokozuna of Japan, but was fairly small in size and as a puppy, he was often ill and was very small in size. The Japanese Dogmen saw nothing in the dog, and were not going to do something with him, so that the professor took him into his house. When the dog gets older, he became aggressive towards other dogs. So the professor decided to train him and bring him to the Tosa fighting. Although small in stature, had the dog had a lot of character, drive and will to win and became Yokozuna. Despite being almost blind in later life, Kouryukan remained active in the ring and was never defeated. The Japanese were so impressed by his story, Yukio Togawa wrote a book about a dog named Monogatari, the story of a Tosa Inu, but only available in Japanese. For people trying to understand something about the Bushi do, here is a small video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfG6Sakc ... re=related


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Rules in Japan


The following grades compete in Japan.


Maegashira: Amateur fighter
Komusubi: Professional fighter, 4 rounds
Sekiwake: rising fighter
Ozeki: profesional fighter - 10 laps Championship challenger
Yokozuna: Champion
Yushoken: Individual tournament champion





Honorary titles

Senshuken: Japanese National Grand Champion: This prestigious title should only be given during the lifetime of the dog. The fighter should be ranked higher than Yokuzuna, and chosen by judges.


Meike Yokozuna: Warrior Grand Champion: The competitor must have three fights as a Senshuken with a record of no less than two wins and a tie. Thirty-two dogs from more than four hundred fifty National Japan Grand Champions have achieved this prestigious honor.

Gaifu Taisho: tried to identify the most effective fighting technique



Tosa 土 使 闘 犬
(Tosa-Ken, Tosa-Inu, Tosa Touken, Tosa Token,
Japanese Mastiff)


Weight Class


Kogata light weight 30-40 kg
Chugata middle weight40 mid-45 kg
Oogata heavy weight 45-55 kg
Cho-oogata superheavyweight 55 kg to unlimited

And in some regions there's the weight class Musabetsu, over 65 kg and no limit.

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During the competition are three referees on the top of the ring, the owners are at the top of the ring and two judges are at the bottom. The owners are allowed to come into the ring as they see need for it. The Tosa is allowed low growl heard during the first 2 minutes, just after this, they need to keep quiet. The Tosa who whines, barks or growls (Seri) is the loser. If at any time during the fight the Tosa doing 3 steps back from his opponent (Hashiri), or try to leave the ring, puts his nose through the bars, he has lost. As a Tosa is disqualified, the other is automatically the winner. If both dogs gothe full 20 or 30 minutes, it's a tie. 20 minutes matches are most held in the summer because of the heat. The Japanese are not fond of a tie. There are nearly 250 of the Tosa Ken rules be strictly observed. The Tosa is also judged assessed by the length of the struggle, the strength of the opponent, courage and endurance. The longer the dog has struggled so much higher valuation. The Tosa weight class is aligned with the other Tosa, up 2 pounds up or down, no more. The dogs must be equal in performance and titles. You will never see a Meagashire standing in the ring with a Yokozuna.
Degrees awarded continue to be valid.


Races as described above, are for many years done only by males. The female Tosa in Japan is used only for breeding, but is tested for character and temperament.

Kotetsu, first Meiken yokozuna middleweight

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Raiden, one of the the best Tosa's in his time.

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Last edited by sumoaiko on 18. January 2012, 08:23, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 15. January 2012, 13:50

There are 2 studbooks from the Tosa Inu in Japan, the first one can't be found, the second studbook is from the 70's

studboek 1

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studboek 2

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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 15. January 2012, 14:01

Some pics from studbook 1

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Zen'Nihon Tosainu Zenshu Taikan from the Sudos, original published in Meiken Gaho

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Some pics from studbook 2


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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 16. January 2012, 17:07

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Japanese use, and the JKC

The Tosa Inu is still best known for its success and use in traditional Japanese fighting dog tournaments. The use of the Tosa has changed little over the years and the Tosa are rarely kept as pets or as guard dogs or as protection type.
The Japanese police, army and those who need special protection almost exclusively use imported German breeds like German Shepherd, Rottweiler or Malinois.

Since 1997, the Tosa Inu divided by the JKC as a guard dog or a pet.
The JKC in Japan have little or no Tosas their registered. They are not involved in the breed and of course they placed the Tosa as a pet or guard dog, because she did not want to use the dog fights because of how it will be seen in the West. The majority of overseas sent Tosas was not the most desirable line Tosas as it clearly in the hands of the Western show breeders would be wasted, being the true fighting spirit and the true capabilities of the Tosa fighting could undermine. The Tosa in Japan has always been a working breed. Which means it was made for the fight in the ring and continues to excel in this particular area until today. In the West, dogfighting is not justified as legitimate work criteria and thus the Tosa conveniently as a working breed not put down. Upon contact with the JKC has never heard of Tosa's being shown in JKC events, so it's safe to assume that the Tosa in Japan only is used as a fighter. The western Tosa is the victim of the rare breed show crowd who know little of the true fighting aspects of breed and culture, and more importantly not strive to breed the traditional fighting spirit which is endowed with the Tosa. The gap between Western and Japanese Tosa shows more to expand.
There are several activities that will help to ensure a healthy physical Tosa more than just participate in clubs and dog shows. Weight pulling, big game hunting, AD, treadmill, and agility are great legal alternatives, which may Tosa can participate. A good physical Tosa should be easy to perform in these types of physical events and challenges as they receive the proper training and motivation. Japanese dog trainers recommend off strongly the use of the Tosa in protection, Schutzhund, or any other nature of this kind of work . The Tosa is a very powerful breed and if they have to be active against people is certainly irresponsible and contrary to the nature of the Tosa. That nature should be seen as stable and friendly to humans, but aggressive towards dogs and animals. There are many other varieties better suited for this work.

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Last edited by sumoaiko on 17. January 2012, 07:10, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 16. January 2012, 17:10

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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sunnyAK on 16. January 2012, 22:48

i have to thank you a lot ton. this is the best Tosa breed profile i have ever seen, with all these pictures and so much info. 8-)
i would say in the beginning the Tosa inu was more a "landrace" or let´s say a type of dog and maybe to a certain degeree it is still like that.
it is always interesting as some Tosas i like a lot, but many i do not like juding by looks. some seem to have weak hind legs, but i guess as long as they have the right attitude it fits the breed standard.
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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 17. January 2012, 07:14

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1OWTfMG ... re=related

Takashi Hirose tells about the Tosa after WW 2

Kanryu, first Meiken Yokozuna Fukyukai association

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note: the title Gaifu Taisho (best fighting technique) is named after the founder of Fukyukai, Gaifu Nakajima

Tenshi, one of the best middleweights in the 30's in Tokyo

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Hayabusa, one of 22 Yokozuna titled dogs in Kochi after WW2

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Kirakawa, Ozeki in Kochi in 1910


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some Tosa's from the 30's

Wakatsurugi

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Tsurugiyama

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Tsukasa tenryu

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Suiryoku

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Jiromaru

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Denryoku

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and some old Tosa pictures

Kubo
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Kiyotomo
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Terutoki
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Kimenzan
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And some old Korean Tosa's

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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 17. January 2012, 18:54

Kyono Hyoemon from Akita, who also had famous Tosa's as Raiden and Kirikawa brought to Akita, imported in the 1920's Great danes Brikka en Gamakka to mix them with the Tosa Inu.

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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 17. January 2012, 18:59

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Old fighting rings Odate

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Tosa just before WW2

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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 17. January 2012, 19:02

Korean Tosa's

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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 17. January 2012, 19:11

presentation of Yokozuna Tosa Inu in Kochi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DULCRbmS ... re=related

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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 18. January 2012, 08:29

Tosa article Carl Semenic

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X raying of hips and medical issues

The Japanese opinion is that the fighting spirit of the Tosa and its ability in the ring is the first and most important criteria in breeding Tosa. Typically form follows function and those with terrible confirmation and bad hips may not excel in the ring.
Likewise, just because a Tosa has perfect confirmation and hips, but lacks the true fighting spirit and cannot perform, will not be bred. X raying hips for consideration certainly has its merits but is not widely practiced in Japan as most of the Tosa's that are bred would need strong hips to drive its opponent around in the ring during a bout.
Many of the Western Tosa's came from a small gene pool and maybe more prone to congenital diseases.
Certainly the conditions for a fighting Tosa in Japan would preclude individuals prone to disease to be fought or bred.
Most of the Japanese Tosa are extremely healthy and rarely if ever need veterinary care.
Last edited by sumoaiko on 15. February 2012, 10:44, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sunnyAK on 3. February 2012, 03:55

awesome work ton! you really did a fantastic job, i thank you very much mate!
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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sumoaiko on 15. February 2012, 11:13

The APBT has been incorporated in the Tosa from the beginning. The APBT as it is known today was once commonly known as a bulldog, bull/terrier, etc. The first dog that was bred to the native Shikoku fighting Spitz was the old type bulldog, which from all historical accounts was very similar to the present APBT. Furthermore, there are pictures of the old APBT in old Tosa books from the early 1900's that were obviously crossed into the Tosa. The caption in those pictures reads "American Fighting Dog" which can only be the APBT. Therefore, the APBT as did the Mastiff, and other Western breeds did influence the early Tosa, indeed from the beginning.
More then 30 years ago the APBT was reintroduced to Japan and created interest with Japanese dog men. For it's size, the APBT showed great tenacity, strength and gameness even against the larger more powerfull Tosa. In some smaller Tosa fighting clubs such as the Yukokai and Hasshyu, pure catchweight APBT's compete against lightweight Tosa's and certainly mixes of the both are also prevalant in all Tosa Fighting associations today.
Remember the fighting clubs in Japan are not the confirmation social clubs. You bring Tosa's that can win, the color etc, are fairly insignificant.
The constant cycle of performance and exploration of pitting against other fighting breeds only develops the Tosa into a more competitive breed, through both incorporation and competitve selection to weed out those Tosa's that cannot be competitive with APBT and its crosses.

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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby sunnyAK on 17. February 2012, 04:25

ton i have really never met anybody who had more information and pictures concerning the Tosa Inu. you posts are an awesome contribution to this breed encyclopedia. thank you a lot! 8-)
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Re: Tosa Inu

Postby Lscarlette on 22. February 2012, 00:21

Couple of questions and comment. 1st do Tosa get along with others dog they have been brought up with ? or are their still apt to be fights.
Does any one have pics of the Shikoku? (spelling?)?would be nice to see some?
Are they still breeding Tosa with the APTB? or are they stopping that?
Loved loved the pics some really beautiful dogs... I hear they are very responsive to their owners , how do they do with children?





sunnyAK wrote:ton i have really never met anybody who had more information and pictures concerning the Tosa Inu. you posts are an awesome contribution to this breed encyclopedia. thank you a lot! 8-)
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